Page by Page: Summer reading for your child

Natasha Thorager

BY NATASHA THORAGER
GAZETTE COLUMNIST

Summer reading is critical in keeping your child’s fluency and comprehension up for the fall. Is there a special time and place set aside in your home for reading? Do you read with your child? Hop into one of these entertaining reads.

“Butterfly, Butterfly” by Petr Horacek: On a nice summer day, Lucy finds a beautiful butterfly. When it flies off, Lucy goes in search of it, finding creatures of all colors. She couldn’t find the butterfly anywhere. This is a great book to read when children are learning colors. It would be perfectly paired with “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle. Best for ages 3-5.

“The Wonderful Book” by Leonid Gore: What is this thing that is found lying in the forest. Is it a table? A hat? A house? It isn’t until a little boy comes by to show the animals what this object is. Best for readers ages 4-6.

“Hug it Out” by Louis Thomas: The solution to the problem of her two children arguing for a mother is to have them hug it out until they stop. Soon it no longer becomes a punishment. Will this work in your house? Best for ages 4-7.

“Duck, Duck, Moose” by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen: Growing up in Minnesota, we played Duck, Duck, Gray Duck, but I found out as I became an adult that in most places that game is called Duck, Duck, Goose. Make sure to play this game (both variations) with your child before or after reading this. This book requires some careful attention to the illustrations to catch the problem at the end of the book. Moose always has a way of making a mess of things, even his own party. How does he cause a problem at the end? Best for readers 4-7.

“Guess Again” by Mac Barnett: The crazy author/illustrator team of Mac Barnett and Adam Rex pair up again in this hilarious guessing tale. Told in a rhyme, the reader needs to guess what is going to come next. The surprise comes when the answer is nothing of what is expected. Both parents and children will love reading this book and laughing out loud. Best for ages 4-8.

“The Lemonade War” by Jacqueline Davies: Evan and his younger sister Jessie started a contest early in the summer. The goal was to see who could earn the most money over the course of the summer. In the last few days of summer vacation, the battle between the two becomes even more intense. Whose talents will help them win the contest, and will the war separate them forever? Best for ages 9-12.

“Lawn Boy” by Gary Paulsen: Continuing on our theme of summer entrepreneurship, is this book focusing on a 12-year-old boy who is given a lawn mower from his grandmother for his birthday. Soon after starting to mow a neighbor’s yard, he gets more and more clients. One client named Arnold, encourages him to learn about the stock market and how the economy works. Delivered in a funny way that readers can put themselves in the book, this book is a perfect, short summer read. Then take off on reading the sequel, “Lawn Boy Returns.” Best for ages 9-12.

Natasha Thorager is a media specialist and intervention teacher for Stillwater Area Public Schools. She loves putting the right book in the right reader’s hands. Contact her at [email protected]