Groups honor city for legacy fund use

Stillwater Mayor Ken Harycki, center holding plaque, is joined by members of Conservation Minnesota and Minnesota Citizens for the Arts at a brief ceremony at Tuesday night’s council in which the two groups honored the city and surrounding area for its use of Legacy funds. (Submitted photo)

Stillwater Mayor Ken Harycki, center holding plaque, is joined by members of Conservation Minnesota and Minnesota Citizens for the Arts at a brief ceremony at Tuesday night’s council in which the two groups honored the city and surrounding area for its use of Legacy funds. (Submitted photo)

Conservation Minnesota and Minnesota Citizens for the Arts Tuesday presented the city of Stillwater and surrounding community with a plaque Tuesday honoring the city for taking advantage of Legacy funds and embracing of the fund’s goals.

Stillwater was among nine cities recognized for their roles in utilizing Legacy funds to make their communities better for residents and visitors. This year’s other legacy destinations are Apple Valley, Coon Rapids, Hastings, Maplewood, Nisswa, Plymouth, Rushford and Two Harbors.

“Each year we single out a handful of communities who seem to be embracing the true spirit of the Legacy Amendment,” said Paul Austin, Executive Director of Conservation Minnesota. “And by looking at the cross-section of arts and outdoors projects that have been helped by the amendment in the previous year, it is clear that this year, Stillwater deserved recognition.”

“When we looked at which cities around the state were doing great work in utilizing the Legacy Amendment, Stillwater stood out,” said Sheila Smith, Executive Director of the Minnesota Citizens for the Arts. “Be it the Square Lake Film Festival or any of the great work being done by ArtReach, Stillwater is really benefitting from the passage of this amendment.”

In 2008, the voters of Minnesota overwhelmingly approved the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment which added 3/8 of one percent to the state’s sales tax, and dedicated the revenue to projects that would help preserve the state’s arts and outdoors legacy.

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